Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Sorcery: Memory Spells

Sorcery: Memory Spells

Even though I have already converted spells that make the subject forget something, there are still some memory-related spells left. False Memory implants a delusion. Memorize temporarily imbues the caster with perfect memory. Recall makes the subject recall a fact. Remember Path makes the target always able to retrace his path.
  
False Memory
Keywords: Resisted (Will).
Full Cost: 10 points.
Casting Roll: IQ. Use IQ (again) or Brainwashing to add the disadvantage.
Range: Unlimited.
Duration: Three days.

You can implant a temporary false memory in the subject’s mind, adding him the Delusions (see p. B130) disadvantage. If the subject is willing, no resistance roll is needed. If not, he resists with Will and must be completely immobilized or otherwise under your control while you cast the spell. Successful casting gets you inside of his head. You must then win a second Quick Contest of IQ vs. Will – or make another unopposed IQ roll, for a willing subject. You may substitute Brainwashing for IQ, if better. You are at -1 per full -5 points of disadvantages applied.
Statistics: Mind Control (Accessibility, Only to add Delusions, -40%; Conditioning Only, -50%; Fixed Duration, +0%; Sorcery, -15%) [10].

Memorize
Keywords: None.
Full Cost: 7 points.
Casting Roll: None.
Range: Self.
Duration: 10 seconds.

All that the caster perceives at the time of casting (and for 10 seconds thereafter) is implanted perfectly in his memory, as if he had Photographic Memory (p. B51). The spell can be used to memorize maps, faces, an event, etc. It cannot be used to learn a skill or to retain a magically borrowed one.
The memory lingers perfectly for a day. After that, check IQ every day, at a cumulative -1 per day. On a critical success, the memory becomes permanent; on an ordinary success, the memory is still there. On an ordinary failure, the memory fades to the level that the caster would normally have of the event; on a critical failure, a false memory is created (still susceptible to eventual fading).
Statistics: Photographic Memory (Reduced Duration, 1/6, -15%; Sorcery, -15%) [7].
  
Recall
Keywords: Buff.
Full Cost: 21 points.
Casting Roll: IQ. Use Innate Attack (Gaze) to aim.
Range: 100 yards.
Duration: Instantaneous.

The subject recalls a single forgotten or obscured fact or event as if he had Photographic Memory (p. B51). The caster makes an IQ roll to restore the memory in question. Time penalties apply, based on the time since the forgotten event occurred. Use Long-Distance Modifiers (p. B241) and substitute “days” for “miles.” Eidetic Memory of the subject gives a +5 bonus; Photographic Memory of the subject gives a +10 bonus (though individuals with Photographic Memory will only need this spell to restore unnaturally removed memories). Only a critical success allows a magically blocked memory to be recalled. A critical failure could cause a false or distorted memory, or eradicate the memory beyond hope of future recovery!
Statistics: Affliction 1 (HT; Advantage, Recall, +90%; Fixed Duration, +0%; Increased 1/2D, 10x, +15%; No Signature, +20%; Reduced Duration, 1/180, -40%; Requires IQ Roll, -10%; Sorcery, -15%; Time-Spanning, Past, +50%) [21]. Notes: “Recall” is Photographic Memory (Magical, -10%) [9].
  
Remember Path
Keywords: Buff.
Full Cost: 21 points.
Casting Roll: None. Use Innate Attack (Gaze) to aim.
Range: 100 yards.
Duration: 30 minutes.

The subject always knows which way is north, and he can always retrace a path he has followed while the spell was active, no matter how faint or confusing. This ability does not work in environments such as interstellar space or the limbo of the astral plane, but it does work underground, underwater, and on other planets. This gives +3 to Body Sense and Navigation (Air, Land, or Sea).
Statistics: Affliction (HT; Advantage, Remember Path, +50%; Extended Duration, 10x, +40%; Fixed Duration, +0%; Increased 1/2D, 10x, +15%; No Signature, +20%; Sorcery, -15%) [21]. Notes: “Remember Path” is Absolute Direction (Magical, -10%) [5].

No comments:

Post a Comment